Plot kicks around what is not an uninteresting idea. A little British village comes under the spell of some strange, supernatural force which first puts everybody out for the count. Then the villagers come to and find that every woman capable of being pregnant is.

Plot kicks around what is not an uninteresting idea. A little British village comes under the spell of some strange, supernatural force which first puts everybody out for the count. Then the villagers come to and find that every woman capable of being pregnant is.

Snag is that all the children are little monsters. They all look alike – fair haired, unblinking stare and with intellects the equivalent of adults, plus the knack of mental telepathy. George Sanders, a physicist, is intimately involved, since his wife is the mother of the leader of the little gang of abnormal moppets. Sanders decides to probe the mystery.

If there had happend to be any hint of why this remarkable business should have occurred, the film [from the novel The Midwich Cuckoos by John Wyndham] would have been slightly more plausible. As it is, this just tapers off from a taut beginning into soggy melodrama. Wolf Rilla’s direction is adequate, but no more.

Village of the Damned

Production

M-G-M. Director Wolf Rilla; Producer Ronald Kinnoch; Screenplay Stirling Silliphant, Wolf Rilla, George Barclay; Camera Geoffrey Faithfull; Editor Gordon Hales; Music Ron Goodwin; Art Director Ivan King

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1960. Running time: 77 MIN.

With

George Sanders Barbara Shelley Michael Gwynn Laurence Naismith John Phillips Richard Vernon
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