Eroica consists of two separate stories [from novellas by Jerzy Stefan Stawinski], unrelated in themselves, but both concerned with an aspect of the disillusionment of Poles in the calamitous days of 1944.

Eroica consists of two separate stories [from novellas by Jerzy Stefan Stawinski], unrelated in themselves, but both concerned with an aspect of the disillusionment of Poles in the calamitous days of 1944.

Scherzo alla Polacca, the first vignette, treats this theme in comic form, with the hero cast as a disenchanted volunteer trying to avoid underground training for the Warsaw uprising. His drunkenness, disregard for safety and believable cowardice when sober are stated with humorous effect that often borders on the burlesque, but come out as something sane in a world gone mad. His will to survive finally becomes more acceptable than any desire for heroic death. Edward Dziewonski’s portrayal of the cowardly hero is great.

Ostinato Lugubre, more assured as an episode, revolves around the grim joke in which a fictitious escapee from a German POW camp for Polish officers boosts the morale of his fellow prisoners. In point of fact, the ‘escapee’ lies hidden from Germans and comrades alike to maintain the illusion that he did get away.

Technically the film is satisfactory, and music effective. Biggest plus is contained in the visual humor.

Eroica

Poland

Production

Kadr. Director Andrzej Munk; Screenplay Jerzy Stefan Stawinski; Camera Jerzy Wojcik; Editor Jadwiga Zaicek, Miroslawa Garlicka; Music Jan Krenz

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1958. Running time: 83 MIN.

With

Edward Dziewonski Barbara Polomska Leon Niemczyk Jozef Nowak Bogumil Kobiela Tadeusz Lomnicki

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