Richard Matheson scripted from his novel and, while most science-fiction thrillers usually contrive a happy ending, there's no compromise here. Six-footer Grant Williams and his wife (Randy Stuart) run into a fog while boating. She's below, so is untouched, but Williams gets the full force. Soon after, he finds himself shrinking and doctors decide the radioactivity in the fog has reversed his growth processes.

Richard Matheson scripted from his novel and, while most science-fiction thrillers usually contrive a happy ending, there’s no compromise here. Six-footer Grant Williams and his wife (Randy Stuart) run into a fog while boating. She’s below, so is untouched, but Williams gets the full force. Soon after, he finds himself shrinking and doctors decide the radioactivity in the fog has reversed his growth processes.

Director Jack Arnold works up the chills for maximum effect by the time Williams is down to two inches and the family cat takes after him. Also harrowing are his adventures in the cellar with, to him, a giant spider, which he manages to kill using a straight pin as a lance.

The technical staff has done an outstanding job of the trick stuff. Optical effects by Roswell A. Hoffman and Everett H. Broussard make the shrinking visually effective.

The Incredible Shrinking Man

Production

Universal. Director Jack Arnold; Producer Albert Zugsmith; Screenplay Richard Matheson; Camera Ellis W. Carter; Editor Al Joseph; Music Joseph Gershenson (sup.); Art Director Alexander Golitzen, Robert Clatworthy

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1957. Running time: 81 MIN.

With

Grant Williams Randy Stuart April Kent Paul Langton Raymond Bailey William Schallert
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