This taut, well-made and sometimes fascinating western is the first use of Technicolor's new widescreen, anamorphic process, Technirama. Borden Chase has fashioned a script around two brothers - James Stewart, decent, upright; Audie Murphy, wild, a deadly gunman. The Technirama process gives new depth and definition, said to combine the principles of both VistaVision and CinemaScope. Pic was lensed in the Durango-Silverton region of Colorado.

This taut, well-made and sometimes fascinating western is the first use of Technicolor’s new widescreen, anamorphic process, Technirama. Borden Chase has fashioned a script around two brothers – James Stewart, decent, upright; Audie Murphy, wild, a deadly gunman. The Technirama process gives new depth and definition, said to combine the principles of both VistaVision and CinemaScope. Pic was lensed in the Durango-Silverton region of Colorado.

Plot carries a railroad-building backdrop. Stewart is a former railroad employee recalled to help transport the payroll to rail’s-end, previous attempts to take the money through to rebelling workers having been stymied when outlaw gang conducts series of raids. He becomes involved with gang during a train holdup.

Both stars deliver sound portrayals, Murphy making up in color Stewart’s greater footage. Dan Duryea is immense as outlaw chief who isn’t quite certain whether he can outdraw Murphy, a wizard with a gun.

Night Passage

Production

Universal. Director James Neilson; Producer Aaron Rosenberg; Screenplay Borden Chase; Camera William Daniels; Editor Sherman Todd; Music Dimitri Tiomkin; Art Director Alexander Golitzen, Robert Clatworthy

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Extract of a review from 1957. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

James Stewart Audie Murphy Dan Duryea Dianne Foster Elaine Stewart Brandon de Wilde
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