Aside from the fact that this is an upper-drawer western, 3:10 to Yuma will strike many for its resemblance to High Noon. That the climax fizzles must be laid on doorstep of Halsted Welles, who adapts Elmore Leonard's story quite well until that point.

Aside from the fact that this is an upper-drawer western, 3:10 to Yuma will strike many for its resemblance to High Noon. That the climax fizzles must be laid on doorstep of Halsted Welles, who adapts Elmore Leonard’s story quite well until that point.

Glenn Ford portrays the deadly leader of a slickly professional outlaw gang, which holds up a stagecoach. Van Heflin, impoverished neighborhood rancher, helps capture Ford when the latter lags behind his gang, to dally with lovely, lonely town barmaid Felicia Farr.

But Ford’s gang is too strong for local lawmen to handle. Stagecoach owner Robert Emhardt promises a large reward to Heflin and the town drunk (Henry Jones). Idea is to hold Ford in another town, unknown to his gang, until daily train (3:10 of title) can take him to Yuma for trial. Here, story cleaves closely to High Noon formula.

Ford’s switch-casting, as the quietly sinister gang leader, is authoritative, impressive and successful. Heflin measures up fully and convincingly to the rewarding role of the proud and troubled rancher. Farr’s contribution is a short one, but she registers with a touching poignancy and a delicate beauty.

Title song by Ned Washington and George Duning, sung by Frankie Lane under credits and by Norma Zimmer during the picture, is a well-written tune.

3:10 to Yuma

Production

Columbia. Director Delmer Daves; Producer David Heilweil; Screenplay Halsted Welles; Camera Charles Lawton Jr; Editor Al Clarke; Music George Duning; Art Director Frank Hotaling

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1957. Running time: 92 MIN.

With

Glenn Ford Van Heflin Felicia Farr Leora Dana Henry Jones Richard Jaeckel
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