Imaginative gadgets galore, plus plenty of suspense and thrills, make the production a top offering in the space travel category. Best of all the gadgets is Robby, the Robot, and he's well-used for some comedy touches.

Imaginative gadgets galore, plus plenty of suspense and thrills, make the production a top offering in the space travel category. Best of all the gadgets is Robby, the Robot, and he’s well-used for some comedy touches.

The conception of space cruisers, space planet terrain, the monstrous self-operating power plant, and of the terribly frightening spectre that threatens the human principals in the story [by Irving Black and Allen Adler] are weird and wonderful.

With all the technical gadgetry on display and carrying the entertainment load, the players are more or less puppets with no great acting demands made. Leslie Nielsen, space cruiser commander, lands on Altair-4 to search for survivors from a previous flight. He finds Walter Pidgeon, super-scientist, and the latter’s daughter (Anne Francis) who, with Robby, are the planet’s only inhabitants.

Pidgeon, who has gained knowledge beyond usual human limits, wants the rescuers to be gone. Nielsen takes to Francis and she to him, so he determines to seek out the unseen menace.

Credited for the special effects that add the punch to the show are A. Arnold Gillespie, Warren Newcombe, Irving G. Ries and Joshua Meador.

1956: Nomination: Best Special Effects

Forbidden Planet

Production

M-G-M. Director Fred M. Wilcox; Producer Nicholas Nayfack; Screenplay Cyril Hume; Camera George J. Folsey; Editor Ferris Webster; Music Louis Barron, Bebe Barron; Art Director Cedric Gibbons, Arthur Lonergan

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1956. Running time: 98 MIN.

With

Walter Pidgeon Anne Francis Leslie Nielsen Warren Stevens Jack Kelly Earl Holliman
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