A trick ending wraps up the melodrama in Beyond a Reasonable Doubt but comes a little too late to revive interest in a tale that relies too often on pat contrivance rather than logical development. Fritz Lang's direction does what it can to inject suspense and interest but the melodrama never really jells.

A trick ending wraps up the melodrama in Beyond a Reasonable Doubt but comes a little too late to revive interest in a tale that relies too often on pat contrivance rather than logical development. Fritz Lang’s direction does what it can to inject suspense and interest but the melodrama never really jells.

Dana Andrews is a writer engaged to Joan Fontaine, daughter of newspaper publisher Sidney Blackmer. The latter talks Andrews into going along with his scheme for showing up the fallacy of circumstantial evidence that has given ambitious district attorney Philip Bourneuf a long string of convictions.

In brief, Blackmer plans to plant evidence that will get Andrews arrested, tried and convicted for the murder of a burlesque stripper, recently found dead without any clues to indicate the killer. Scheme works as planned, except at the crucial moment Blackmer gets himself killed.

Neither above-mentioned players nor others in the cast add much to make the events credible, seemingly performing with an almost casual air.

Beyond a Reasonable Doubt

Production

RKO. Director Fritz Lang; Producer Bert Friedlob; Screenplay Douglas Morrow; Camera William Snyder; Editor Gene Fowler Jr; Music Herschel Burke Gilbert; Art Director Carroll Clark

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1956. Running time: 80 MIN.

With

Dana Andrews Joan Fontaine Sidney Blackmer Barbara Nichols Philip Bourneuf Shepperd Strudwick
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