It took Alexander the Great some 10 years to conquer the known world back in the fourth century B.C. It seems to take Robert Rossen almost as long to recreate on film this slice of history. Despite the length, however, he has fashioned a spectacle of tremendous size.

It took Alexander the Great some 10 years to conquer the known world back in the fourth century B.C. It seems to take Robert Rossen almost as long to recreate on film this slice of history. Despite the length, however, he has fashioned a spectacle of tremendous size.

Written, produced and directed by Rossen, the presentation is neither niggardly in the coin lavished on its physical makeup nor in the outlay for the talented international cast that enacts the historical saga of a man who believed both that he was a god and in his destiny to unite the world.

Rossen is not always able to hold interest in his story and action, resulting in some long, dull stretches.

Nor do the players have much chance to be more than puppets against the giant sweep of the spectacle. There are a number of single scenes that give the individual characters a chance to grow.

Alexander’s romance with Barsine (Claire Bloom) is more implied than realized, but she does have some fine, expressive moments.

Alexander the Great

Production

Rossen/United Artists. Director Robert Rossen; Producer Robert Rossen; Writer Robert Rossen; Camera Robert Krasker Editor Ralph Kemplen; Music Mario Nascimbene Art Andre Andrejew

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1956. Running time: 143 MIN.

With

Richard Burton Fredric March Claire Bloom Danielle Darrieux Harry Andrews Stanley Baker
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