Bob Hope abandons the buffoon to go straight actor in biopicturing Eddie Foy, song-and-dance man of the vaudeville age.

Bob Hope abandons the buffoon to go straight actor in biopicturing Eddie Foy, song-and-dance man of the vaudeville age.

From the opening when Foy vows he will always remain a single, professionally and maritally, even an audience unfamiliar with his life will know it won’t be long. It isn’t, and Milly Vitale, Italian film actress who does a fine job of portraying the Italian ballerina who marries Foy, is reason enough for him to change his mind. Their hit-and-miss life together is told with heart in the performances of Hope and Vitale.

A standout sequence is the appearance of James Cagney as George M. Cohan, a characterization he created with 1942 Academy Award-winning success in Yankee Doodle Dandy. He and Hope, in a Friars Club scene, toss the Shavelson-Rose lines back and forth for sock results and then turn in some mighty slick hoofing.

1955: Nomination: Best Story & Screenplay

The Seven Little Foys

Production

Paramount. Director Melville Shavelson; Producer Jack Rose; Screenplay Melville Shavelson, Jack Rose; Camera John F. Warren; Editor Ellsworth Hoagland; Music Joseph J. Lilley; Art Director Hal Pereira, John Goodman

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1955. Running time: 92 MIN.

With

Bob Hope James Cagney Milly Vitale Angela Clarke George Tobias Herbert Hayes

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