Review: ‘Three Coins in the Fountain’

Once before, in How to Marry a Millionaire, director Jean Negulesco CinemaScoped a trio of feminine beauties into a lucrative attraction. In Three Coins in the Fountain he repeats this feat but obviously has gained some experience. The film has warmth, humor, a rich dose of romance and almost incredible pictorial appeal.

Once before, in How to Marry a Millionaire, director Jean Negulesco CinemaScoped a trio of feminine beauties into a lucrative attraction. In Three Coins in the Fountain he repeats this feat but obviously has gained some experience. The film has warmth, humor, a rich dose of romance and almost incredible pictorial appeal.

For those who aren’t satisfied feasting their eyes on the stunning backgrounds and the plush interior sets, there is another trio of femme stars – Dorothy McGuire, Jean Peters and Maggie McNamara – in smart and expensive-looking clothes. As their male counterparts they have Clifton Webb, debonnaire and fun as always; Rossano Brazzi, an appealing young Italian and suave Louis Jourdan, appealing as the romantic lead.

Story [from a novel by John H. Secondari] introduces to Rome McNamara, an American coming to take a secretarial job. She’s met by Peters and later introduced to her third room-mate in their sumptuous apartment, McGuire. They all toss a coin in the fountain, and it grants them their wish.

1954: Best Color Cinematography, Song (‘Three Coins in the Fountain’).

Nomination: Best Picture

Three Coins in the Fountain

Production

20th Century-Fox. Director Jean Negulesco; Producer Sol C. Siegel; Screenplay John Patrick; Camera Milton Krasner; Editor William Reynolds; Music Victor Young; Art Director Lyle Wheeler, John De Cuir

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1954. Running time: 101 MIN.

With

Clifton Webb Dorothy McGuire Jean Peters Louis Jourdan Maggie McNamara Rossano Brazzi

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