Sentiment and swing feature in this biopic treatment on the life of the late Glenn Miller. The Miller music, heard in some 20 tunes throughout the production, is still driving, rhythmic swing at its best.

Sentiment and swing feature in this biopic treatment on the life of the late Glenn Miller. The Miller music, heard in some 20 tunes throughout the production, is still driving, rhythmic swing at its best.

The Aaron Rosenberg supervision makes excellent use of the music to counterpoint a tenderly projected love story, feelingly played by James Stewart and June Allyson. The two stars, who clicked previously as a man-wife team in The Stratton Story, have an affinity for this type of thing.

The first 70 minutes of the picture is given over to Miller’s search for a sound in music arrangement that would be his trademark and live after him. Remaining 45 minutes covers the rocketing Miller fame, his enlistment when World War II starts and the service band’s playing for overseas troops.

To match the topflight performances of Stewart and Allyson, the picture has some strong thesping by featured and supporting players, as well as guest star appearances. Henry Morgan stands out as Chummy MacGregor. Charles Drake is good as Don Haynes, the band’s manager.

1954: Best Sound Recording.

Nominations: Best Story & Screenplay, Scoring of a Musical Picture

The Glenn Miller Story

Production

Universal. Director Anthony Mann; Producer Aaron Rosenberg; Screenplay Valentine Davies, Oscar Brodney; Camera William Daniels; Editor Russell Schoengarth; Music Joseph Gershenson (dir.), Henry Mancini (adapt.); Art Director Bernard Herzbrun, Alexander Golitzen

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1954. Running time: 115 MIN.

With

James Stewart June Allyson Charles Drake George Tobias Henry Morgan Barton MacLane
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