There are cowboys and Indians in Cattle Queen of Montana, good and bad whites, peaceful and renegade Indians, and colorful Technicolor scenery, but all these ingredients fail to make the Benedict Bogeaus production anything more than a listless and ordinary western.

There are cowboys and Indians in Cattle Queen of Montana, good and bad whites, peaceful and renegade Indians, and colorful Technicolor scenery, but all these ingredients fail to make the Benedict Bogeaus production anything more than a listless and ordinary western.

The screenplay [from an original story by Thomas Blackburn] is short on imagination and long on cliche, and what takes place on screen appears all to familiar. In the picture’s favor is an attempt to depict the problems of the Redmen in fighting the encroachment of their land by the white settlers. The Indians are not all evil, scalp-hunting devils.

Barbara Stanwyck is the ‘Cattle Queen’ of the story, a gun-totin’ hard-ridin gal determined to establish a Montana ranch stake after her father is killed by the renegades. Ronald Reagan is an undercover army man charged with the duty of ferreting out the element inciting the Indians. Lance Fuller is the university-educated Indian chief who wants to bring peace to his tribe while Anthony Caruso is the leader of the rebel Indians.

Allan Dwan’s direction is slow moving, and even the action sequences fail to bring out the necessary excitement.

Cattle Queen of Montana

Production

RKO. Director Allan Dwan; Producer Benedict Bogeaus; Screenplay Robert Blees, Howard Estabrook; Camera John Alton; Editor James Leicester, Carlo Lodato; Music Louis Forbes;; Art Director Van Nest Polglase

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1954. Running time: 88 MIN.

With

Barbara Stanwyck Ronald Reagan Gene Evans Lance Fuller Anthony Caruso Jack Elan
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