Ann Sheridan and Sterling Hayden head the competent players who, under Douglas Sirk's direction, run through the antics with likeable results. Film goes about its business of being a good, folksy offering in an unpretentious manner and sprinkles in several songs.

Ann Sheridan and Sterling Hayden head the competent players who, under Douglas Sirk’s direction, run through the antics with likeable results. Film goes about its business of being a good, folksy offering in an unpretentious manner and sprinkles in several songs.

Sheridan is a lady with a past who is hiding out from the Federals in a northwest lumber town. When the law, in the person of Larry Gates, gets close to her trail, she takes advantage of a proposition from three engaging young tykes who think she would make a good mother to look after them while their father (Hayden) is busy in the big timber.

Papa gets wind of the situation from a jealous widow (Phyllis Stanley), who has set her own cap for him, and returns home. It doesn’t take him long to see that his kids had the right idea, and it’s only a matter of convincing Miss Sheridan and winning over the strait-laced members of the community, for which he is part-time preacher.

Since Sheridan is a saloon singer, there is ample reason for the sight values of the costumes she wears for display purposes. She does justice to them, as well as furnishing the situations and dialog with a well-charged humorous worldliness that’s a big help to the picture. Hayden is excellent as the logger-preacher.

Take Me to Town

Production

Universal. Director Douglas Sirk; Producer Ross Hunter; Screenplay Richard Morris; Camera Russell Metty; Editor Milton Carruth; Music Joseph Geshenson; Art Director Alexander Golitzen, Hilyard Brown

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1953. Running time: 80 MIN.

With

Ann Sheridan Sterling Hayden Philip Reed Lee Patrick Lee Aaker Phyllis Stanley
Want Entertainment News First? Sign up for Variety Alerts and Newsletters!
Post A Comment 0