Adapted from a novel [Came the Dawn ] by Roger Bax, yarn focuses attention on the problem of Soviet brides. Clark Gable plays an American newspaperman who weds a Russian ballerina (Gene Tierney), but is forced to leave her behind in Moscow, although having secured an exit visa.

Adapted from a novel [Came the Dawn ] by Roger Bax, yarn focuses attention on the problem of Soviet brides. Clark Gable plays an American newspaperman who weds a Russian ballerina (Gene Tierney), but is forced to leave her behind in Moscow, although having secured an exit visa.

Separation takes place after the newspaperman had made his own contribution to the Cold War, and finds himself persona non grata with the Soviet authorities. Back in Washington, he tries his hand at wire-pulling without success, and finally comes to London to tackle Molotov, who is attending a four-power conference.

Plot reeks of implausibility, but this is compensated by bold direction, nimble scripting and lively performances and there is suspense and action in good measure. As an added feature, there is an attractive ballet sequence in which Tierney is partnered by Anton Dolin.

Gable’s interpretation of the newspaperman is sure, solid and confident; Tierney makes an admirable and attractive romantic partner. Bernard Miles is in fine form as a Cornish boat-builder who sails a tub through the Baltic, and Richard Haydn, as Gable’s British partner, scores in an excellent drunk scene when he is feted by Soviet officials.

Never Let Me Go

UK - US

Production

Metro-British. Director Delmer Daves; Producer Clarence Brown; Screenplay Ronald Millar, George Froeschel; Camera Robert Krasker; Editor Frank Clarke; Music Hans May; Art Director Alfred Junge

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1953. Running time: 94 MIN.

With

Clark Gable Gene Tierney Bernard Miles Richard Haydn Belita Kenneth More
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