Jacques Tati, whose comic talents were revealed in Jour de Fete, confirms them in his second pic. Though not as funny as Fete, due to a lesser story peg, this one generates a load of yocks, with fine observation of types at a vacation resort.

Jacques Tati, whose comic talents were revealed in Jour de Fete, confirms them in his second pic. Though not as funny as Fete, due to a lesser story peg, this one generates a load of yocks, with fine observation of types at a vacation resort.

All the types are there, from the robust English spinster to the beach strong-boy, henpecked husband, frustrated, martyred waiter, ingenue, and a host of other characters that give this a rounded, comic feel. Tati builds his gags with sureness, and clever timing and pantomime bring most of them off.

Tati is the semi-articulate, blundering but well-meaning clown, reminiscent of the early Mack Sennett types. Whether he is being chased by dogs, setting off a cabin full of fireworks, or blundering into a staid funeral, he is a very funny man. He has a weird broken-down car that is also a good source of gags.

Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot

France

Production

Cady/Discina/Eclair Journal. Director Jacques Tati; Screenplay Jacques Tati, Henri Marquet, P. Aubert, Jacques Lagrange; Camera Jacques Mercanton, Jean Mousselle; Editor Suzanne Baron, Charles Bretoneiche, Grassi; Music Alain Romans; Art Director Roger Briaucourt, Henri Schmitt

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1953. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

Jacques Tati Nathalie Pascaud Louis Perrault Michele Rolla Andre Dubois Valentine Camax

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