Picture has been smartly fashioned to take advantage of all the tricks of science-fiction and 3-D. Stereo process is not used as just an excuse to pelt an audience with flying objects and, with one exception, when missiles come out of the screen they are tied in logically with the story.

Picture has been smartly fashioned to take advantage of all the tricks of science-fiction and 3-D. Stereo process is not used as just an excuse to pelt an audience with flying objects and, with one exception, when missiles come out of the screen they are tied in logically with the story.

Direction by Jack Arnold whips up an air of suspense and there is considerable atmosphere of reality created, which stands up well enough if the logic of it all is not examined too closely. Some of the threat posed by the landing of visitors from space on earth is lessened when it is established the chance visitors intend no harm.

Otherwise, the Ray Bradbury story proves to be good science-fiction. Yarn opens with Richard Carlson, a scientist, and Barbara Rush, his school-teacher fiancee, observing the landing of a fiery object in the Arizona desert. At first believing it is a meteor, Carlson changes his opinion when he ventures into the crater. Strange things begin to happen in the community. Townspeople disappear and their likenesses are taken over by the space visitors.

Carlson is excellent as the scientist, and Rush makes an attractive partner. Charles Drake is good as the sheriff, and there are some excellent supporting performances.

It Came from Outer Space

Production

Universal. Director Jack Arnold; Producer William Alland; Screenplay Harry Essex; Camera Clifford Stine; Editor Paul Weatherwax; Music Joseph Gershenson (dir.); Art Director Bernard Herzbrun, Robert Boyle

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1953. Running time: 80 MIN.

With

Richard Carlson Barbara Rush Charles Drake Russell Johnson Kathleen Hughes Joseph Sawyer
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