Fanciers of costumed swashbucklers will find this remake of the venerable Prisoner of Zenda a likeable version. The third time around for the yarn [adapted by Wells Root from the novel by Anthony Hope and dramatization by Edward Rose] this time it wears Tehnicolor dress, and has lavish physical appurtenances.

Fanciers of costumed swashbucklers will find this remake of the venerable Prisoner of Zenda a likeable version. The third time around for the yarn [adapted by Wells Root from the novel by Anthony Hope and dramatization by Edward Rose] this time it wears Tehnicolor dress, and has lavish physical appurtenances.

Plot deals with an Englishman who goes on a holiday to the small kingdom of Ruritania and gets involved in a royal impersonation and a love affair with a beautiful princess. Stewart Granger is the hero, dualing as the Englishman and the king he impersonates, and gives the roles the proper amount of dashing heroics.

Opposite him is Deborah Kerr, the lovely princess, and her looks and ability to wear period gowns are just what the part requires. James Mason scores as Rupert of Hentzau, making the character a rather likeable heavy.

Lewis Stone, who played the dual role in the original 1922 version of the story, appears briefly in this one as a cardinal.

The Prisoner of Zenda

Production

M-G-M. Director Richard Thorpe; Producer Pandro S. Berman; Screenplay John L. Balderston, Noel Langley; Camera Joseph Ruttenberg; Editor George Boemler; Music Alfred Newman; Art Director Cedric Gibbons, Hans Peters

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1952. Running time: 100 MIN.

With

Stewart Granger Deborah Kerr James Mason Louis Calhern Jane Greer Lewis Stone
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