This novelty feature boasts of being the first full-length film in Natural Vision 3-D. Although adding backsides to usually flat actors and depth to landscapes, the 3-D technique still needs further technical advances.

This novelty feature boasts of being the first full-length film in Natural Vision 3-D. Although adding backsides to usually flat actors and depth to landscapes, the 3-D technique still needs further technical advances.

Without the paper-framed, polaroid glasses Natural Vision looks like a ghosty television picture. While watching 3-D, viewers are constantly forced to refocus their vision as the focus of the film changes, resulting in a tiring eye workout.

The Oboler production is full of tricks devised to show off the process, rather than to tell the screen story effectively. The much-ballyhooed point of a lion seemingly leaping out of the screen into the auditorium comes off very mildly. The single gasper is the throwing of a spear by a native, which has the illusion of coming right into the audience.

With banal dialog, stilted sequences and impossibly-directed players, Oboler tells a story, based on fact, of how two lions halt the building of a railroad in British East Africa.

Bwana Devil

Production

Oboler/United Artists. Director Arch Oboler; Producer Arch Oboler; Screenplay Arch Oboler; Camera Joseph F. Biroc; Editor John Hoffman; Music Gordon Jenkins

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1952. Running time: 79 MIN.

With

Robert Stack Barbara Britton Nigel Bruce Ramsay Hill Paul McVey
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