Strictly offbeat subject matter centers around a weird, outlandish interplanetary space-hopper (see title) which descends upon earth in what's referred to as a flying saucer.

Strictly offbeat subject matter centers around a weird, outlandish interplanetary space-hopper (see title) which descends upon earth in what’s referred to as a flying saucer.

Christian Nyby’s direction sustains a mood of tingling expectancy as a small group of US airmen and scientists stationed near the North Pole learn that a new, mysterious element is playing tricks with their compass-readings, etc. Tension develops effectively as the expedition takes off to reckon with the unearthly intruder. Hawks’ production also scores in its depiction of the bleak, snow-swept Arctic region. The background layout, shot in Montana, conveys an air of frigid authenticity.

But the resourcefulness shown in building the plot groundwork is lacking as the yarn gets into full swing. Cast members, headed by Margaret Sheridan and Kenneth Tobey, fail to communicate any real terror as the ‘Thing’ makes its appearance and its power potential to destroy the world is revealed.

Screenplay, based on the story Who Goes There? by John W. Campbell Jr., shows strain in the effort to come up with a cosmic shocker in the name of science fiction.

The Thing from Another World

Production

Winchester/RKO. Director Christian Nyby; Producer Howard Hawks; Screenplay Charles Lederer; Camera Russell Harlan; Editor Roland Gross; Music Dimitri Tiomkin; Art Director Albert S. D'Agostino, John J. Hughes

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1951. Running time: 89 MIN.

With

Margaret Sheridan Kenneth Tobey Robert Cornthwaite Douglas Spencer Dewey Martin James Arness
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