The plot line is strung together with a series of episodes in the life of a minister and his city-bred bride on their first duty for the church. Location of the assignment is in the red-clay hills of North Georgia, and 20th-Fox sent its cast and cameras to the actual sites, giving the picture authenticity.

The plot line is strung together with a series of episodes in the life of a minister and his city-bred bride on their first duty for the church. Location of the assignment is in the red-clay hills of North Georgia, and 20th-Fox sent its cast and cameras to the actual sites, giving the picture authenticity.

Episodes are told through the eyes of Susan Hayward, the bride, thrust into a strange life but with enough courage and ingenuity to win out over adversity. While the Corra Harris novel has a familiar ring, in that pattern is similar to novels of other femmes who have gone into the wilderness as brides, the script, the performances and Henry King’s understanding direction keep this account always interesting.

Hayward shines as the bride who encounters a completely strange life during her three years in the hills. William Lundigan scores as the very human minister, young enough to err but with a deep belief in his religion to see him through the shepherding of his mountain flock.

I'd Climb the Highest Mountain

Production

20th Century-Fox. Director Henry King; Producer Lamar Trotti; Screenplay Lamar Trotti; Camera Edward Cronjager; Editor Barbara McLean; Music Sol Kaplan; Art Director Lyle Wheeler, Maurice Ransford

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1951. Running time: 87 MIN.

With

Susan Hayward William Lundigan Rory Calhoun Barbara Bates Gene Lockhart Lynn Bari
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