Richard Walton Tully's old legit piece, Bird of Paradise, makes another trip to the screen in a refurbished version. Previous filming of the play was in 1932 and, while Delmer Daves' version deviates from the Tully form, the essentials of the drama are still there, plus a beautiful Technicolor camera job, haunting island music and the use of actual locales.

Richard Walton Tully’s old legit piece, Bird of Paradise, makes another trip to the screen in a refurbished version. Previous filming of the play was in 1932 and, while Delmer Daves’ version deviates from the Tully form, the essentials of the drama are still there, plus a beautiful Technicolor camera job, haunting island music and the use of actual locales.

Louis Jourdan and Debra Paget play the roles of the white man and native girl. There’s another strong casting in Jeff Chandler, seen in the new character of a native who returns to his island after a try at stateside living. With him comes Jourdan. There the latter meets Chandler’s sister (Paget). It is love at first sight, but native courting customs must first be satisfied, as well as the medicine man, who sees evil in the white man’s visit.

Paget hits a high level in her performance as the Princess Kalua. She, as well as the other players give their characters considerable sincerity. Jourdan is an excellent choice as the island visitor, as is Chandler as the prince.

Bird of Paradise

Production

20th Century-Fox. Director Delmer Daves; Producer Harmon Jones; Screenplay Delmer Daves; Camera Winton C. Hoch; Editor James B. Clark; Music Daniele Amfitheatrof; Art Director Lyle Wheeler, Albert Hogsett

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1951. Running time: 100 MIN.

With

Louis Jourdan Debra Paget Jeff Chandler Everett Sloane Jack Elam Maurice Schwartz
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