In The Men producer Stanley Kramer turns to the difficult cinematic subject of paraplegics, so expertly treated as to be sensitive, moving and yet, withal, entertaining and earthy-humored.

In The Men producer Stanley Kramer turns to the difficult cinematic subject of paraplegics, so expertly treated as to be sensitive, moving and yet, withal, entertaining and earthy-humored.

From the opening shot, a tensely-played battle scene where Lieutenant Wilozek (Marlon Brando) suffers his crushing wound, The Men maintains its pace and interest. Thereafter, the film centers on the overwhelming problems of paralyzed vets who must be convinced that their wounds are incurable and that they must yet fight their way to a useful existence.

While the film personalizes the story of Wilozek and his fiancee (Teresa Wright), the camera‘s scope is broader.

Brando, who film-debuts as Wilozek, fails to deliver the necessary sensitivity and inner warmth.

1950: Nomination: Best Story & Screenplay

The Men

Production

United Artists. Director Fred Zinnemann; Producer Stanley Kramer; Screenplay Carl Foreman; Camera Robert de Grasse; Editor Harry Gerstad; Music Dimitri Tiomkin

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1950. Running time: 85 MIN.

With

Marlon Brando Teresa Wright Everett Sloane Jack Webb Richard Erdman
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