Review: ‘The Black Rose’

Produced in England and North Africa with frozen currency, and with a supporting British cast, Rose is an adaptation of the Thomas B. Costain bestseller. It is 13th-century drama that seems hardly to have ignored a thing in its plotting.

Produced in England and North Africa with frozen currency, and with a supporting British cast, Rose is an adaptation of the Thomas B. Costain bestseller. It is 13th-century drama that seems hardly to have ignored a thing in its plotting.

Black Rose is the story of Saxon revolt against Norman domination, 200 years after the conquest. The central figure in the Saxon fight is Walter of Gurnie (Tyrone Power), the illegitimate son of a Saxon peer.

In a picture of warring, there is only the suggestion of battle. Perhaps one good scene, with some honest-to-goodness cinematic blood-letting, might have done something to increase the tempo of the picture.

Power is credible in the lead role, while Welles underplays effectively the part of Bayan.

1950: Nomination: Best Color Costume Design

The Black Rose

US - UK

Production

20th Century-Fox. Director Henry Hathaway; Producer Louis D. Lighton; Screenplay Talbot Jennings; Camera Jack Cardiff; Editor Manuel del Campo; Music Richard Addinsell; Art Director Paul Sherriff, W. Andrews

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1950. Running time: 120 MIN.

With

Tyrone Power Orson Welles Cecile Aubry Jack Hawkins Michael Rennie Herbert Lom

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