Review: ‘Never a Dull Moment’

Never a Dull Moment doesn't always live up to its title in telling the story of a smooth femme songwriter who falls in love with a western rancher and goes to his impoverished acreage to make a home. George Marshall's direction is a great help in selling the physical business that goes with the comedy, and where scripting isn't strong he still manages chuckles for the average audience.

Never a Dull Moment doesn’t always live up to its title in telling the story of a smooth femme songwriter who falls in love with a western rancher and goes to his impoverished acreage to make a home. George Marshall’s direction is a great help in selling the physical business that goes with the comedy, and where scripting isn’t strong he still manages chuckles for the average audience.

Incidents build to a point where Irene Dunne, as the songsmith, accidentally kills the prize bull of cantankerous William Demarest, a neighbor on whom Fred MacMurray depends for water. The married couple quarrel, she takes off for the east and tunecleffing, but finds there’s no inspiration now.

Demarest has little to do other than be grumpy. Andy Devine adds some comedy as MacMurray’s friend. Gigi Perreau and Natalie Wood are good as the little girls. Three songs are spotted in the footage, all written by Kay Swift, who authored the novel on which the script was based.

Never a Dull Moment

Production

RKO. Director George Marshall; Producer Harriet Parsons; Screenplay Lou Breslow, Doris Anderson; Camera Joseph Walker; Editor Robert Swink; Music Frederick Hollander

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1950. Running time: 89 MIN.

With

Irene Dunne Fred MacMurray William Demarest Andy Devine Gigi Perreau Natalie Wood

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