Review: ‘Let’s Dance’

Let's Dance is a light concoction of story, songs and dances, sprinkled with humor, that is generally acceptable as escapist filmfare.

Let’s Dance is a light concoction of story, songs and dances, sprinkled with humor, that is generally acceptable as escapist filmfare.

Plot [suggested by a story by Maurice Zolotow] kicks off with a prolog showing Betty Hutton and Fred Astaire entertaining troops in England. She reveals to him her marriage to a flyer. Story picks up five years later with Hutton’s extrovert character being subdued in the straitlaced environs of a Back Bay Boston mansion, home of her husband, killed in the war. She rebels and steals away in the night with her small son to return to show business.

She meets Astaire again. He gets her a spot; the management and others in the place take to her and the son. In telling this angle the yarn is strung out too long.

Let's Dance

Production

Paramount. Director Norman Z. McLeod; Producer Robert Fellows; Screenplay Allan Scott, Dane Lussier; Camera George Barnes; Editor Ellsworth Hoagland; Music Robert Emmett Dolan (dir.)

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1950. Running time: 111 MIN.

With

Fred Astaire Betty Hutton Roland Young Lucile Watson Gregory Moffett
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