In Lonely Place Humphrey Bogart has a sympathetic role though cast as one always ready to mix it with his dukes. He favors the underdog; in one instance he virtually has a veteran, brandy-soaking character actor (out of work) on his very limited payroll.

In Lonely Place Humphrey Bogart has a sympathetic role though cast as one always ready to mix it with his dukes. He favors the underdog; in one instance he virtually has a veteran, brandy-soaking character actor (out of work) on his very limited payroll.

As the screenplay scrivener who detests the potboilers, Bogart finds himself innocently suspected of a girl’s slaying. Although continually kept under suspicion, he ignores the police attempt to trap him into a confession, at the same time falling for a gal neighbor.

Director Nicholas Ray maintains nice suspense. Bogart is excellent. Gloria Grahame, as his romance, also rates kudos. [Screenplay is from a story by Dorothy B. Hughes, adapted by Edmund H. North.]

In a Lonely Place

Production

Columbia/Santana. Director Nicholas Ray; Producer Henry S. Kesler (assoc.); Screenplay Andrew Solt; Camera Burnett Guffey; Editor Viola Lawrence; Music George Antheil; Art Director Robert Peterson

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1950. Running time: 92 MIN.

With

Humphrey Bogart Gloria Grahame Frank Lovejoy Robert Warwick Jeff Donnell Martha Stewart

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