Review: ‘When Willie Comes Marching Home’

Dan Dailey, in the title role, carries most of the picture alone as a smalltown lad who becomes a hero when he is first to enlist after Pearl Harbor. Immediately after his basic training, though, he is shipped back to a newly-opened air base in the same hometown and the population turns against him when he is held there for over two years as a gunnery instructor.

Dan Dailey, in the title role, carries most of the picture alone as a smalltown lad who becomes a hero when he is first to enlist after Pearl Harbor. Immediately after his basic training, though, he is shipped back to a newly-opened air base in the same hometown and the population turns against him when he is held there for over two years as a gunnery instructor.

Dailey is finally tagged as a last-minute replacement for an ailing B-17 gunner.

Credit for the laugh-fest can be spread among Dailey and the rest of the cast, the excellent script [based on a story by Sy Gomberg] and all connected with the production. But the major share goes to John Ford. Ford turns to comedy for the first time and demonstrates that a laugh-film can also be his forte.

When Willie Comes Marching Home

Production

20th Century-Fox. Director John Ford; Producer Fred Kohlmar; Screenplay Mary Loos, Richard Sale; Camera Leo Tover; Editor James B. Clark; Music Alfred Newman; Art Director Lyle Wheeler, Chester Gore

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1949. Running time: 82 MIN.

With

Dan Dailey Corinne Calvet Colleen Townsend William Demarest Mae Marsh
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