Review: ‘The Winslow Boy’

Terence Rattigan's story, based on an actual incident that occurred just before the First World War, is a simple story of a 13-year-old naval cadet, expelled from school for the alleged theft of a postal order. The boy's father is certain of his innocence and when he fails to have the case reopened, invokes the whole machinery of British democracy by arranging a full-scale parliamentary debate and subsequently bringing a successful action against the King.

Terence Rattigan’s story, based on an actual incident that occurred just before the First World War, is a simple story of a 13-year-old naval cadet, expelled from school for the alleged theft of a postal order. The boy’s father is certain of his innocence and when he fails to have the case reopened, invokes the whole machinery of British democracy by arranging a full-scale parliamentary debate and subsequently bringing a successful action against the King.

It’s more the father’s conviction of his son’s innocence, rather than the incident itself, which forms the background of this well-knit story, with sufficient emphasis on the emotional angles to make it a sure tearjerker. From its brisk opening the plot quickly develops the main theme, building up the fight for justice through a series of incidents which are highlighted by the interview between Robert Morton, MP and famous attorney, and the boy before he decides to accept the brief.

A flawless cast portrays the principal characters to perfection, and minor roles have been painstakingly filled.

The Winslow Boy

UK

Production

British Lion/London. Director Anthony Asquith; Producer Anatole de Grunwald; Screenplay Terence Rattigan, Anatole de Grunwald; Camera Freddie Young; Editor Gerald Turney Smith; Music William Alwyn; Art Director Andre Andrejew

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1948. Running time: 117 MIN.

With

Robert Donat Margaret Leighton Cedric Hardwicke Basil Radford Kathleen Harrison Francis L. Sullivan

Filed Under:

Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading