Review: ‘The Emperor Waltz’

Film is a costumer laid 'in the days' (sic) of Emperor Franz Joseph, and is played to the hilt by Crosby, Joan Fontaine and their supporting cast. Picture has a free-and-easy air that perfectly matches the Crosby style of natural comedy. Co-star Joan Fontaine, better known for heavy, serious roles, demonstrates adaptability that fits neatly into the lighter demands and she definitely scores with charm and talent as the Crosby foil.

Film is a costumer laid ‘in the days’ (sic) of Emperor Franz Joseph, and is played to the hilt by Crosby, Joan Fontaine and their supporting cast. Picture has a free-and-easy air that perfectly matches the Crosby style of natural comedy. Co-star Joan Fontaine, better known for heavy, serious roles, demonstrates adaptability that fits neatly into the lighter demands and she definitely scores with charm and talent as the Crosby foil.

Multiple functions of Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder on Waltz have given film an infectious quality that surmounts the gorgeously apt trappings against which is projected the fable of an American travelling phonograph salesman and his dog who crash the court of the emperor.

There’s plenty of pageantry in the staging of the title number, using the colorful swirling of richly costumed dancers in the palace ballroom as eye-filling backdrop. ‘Friendly Mountains’ has backdrop of processed Tyrol crags and valleys (actually Jasper National Park) filled with native yodelers and dancers.

The Emperor Waltz

Production

Paramount. Director Billy Wilder; Producer Charles Brackett; Screenplay Charles Brackett, Billy Wilder; Camera George Barnes; Editor Doane Harrison; Music Victor Young; Art Director Hans Dreier, Franz Bachelin

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1948. Running time: 106 MIN.

With

Bing Crosby Joan Fontaine Roland Culver Lucile Watson Richard Haydn Sig Ruman
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