Mood of the picture is pleasant but is so even that interest isn't too strong. Dangers of pioneering in a wilderness, vaguely referred to as the northwest, could have been more excitingly depicted. Single incident of excitement - a strong one - is put off until the finale and has a socko Indian raid on a settler's homestead in the wilds.

Mood of the picture is pleasant but is so even that interest isn’t too strong. Dangers of pioneering in a wilderness, vaguely referred to as the northwest, could have been more excitingly depicted. Single incident of excitement – a strong one – is put off until the finale and has a socko Indian raid on a settler’s homestead in the wilds.

Otherwise, narrative maintains its even pace in telling story of a pioneer who buys a bride to do the chores and teach niceties of life to his motherless son. The bride is only a servant until a hunter, friend of the groom, appears and makes a play for her.

William Holden enacts the dour settler, so deeply in love with his dead wife he fails to appreciate, or even notice, the charms of his new bondswoman bride. Loretta Young has only two costume changes and her makeup is true to role, but she makes some glamour shine through. Robert Mitchum is the aimlessly wandering hunter.

Rachel and the Stranger

Production

RKO. Director Norman Foster; Producer Richard H. Berger; Screenplay Waldo Salt; Camera Maury Gertsman; Editor Les Millbrook; Music Roy Webb; Art Director Albert S. D'Agostino, Jack Okey, Walter E. Keller

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1948. Running time: 92 MIN.

With

Loretta Young William Holden Robert Mitchum Gary Gray Tom Tully Sara Haden
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