Louisiana Story is a documentary-type story told almost purely in camera terms. It has a slender, appealing story, moments of agonizing suspense, vivid atmosphere and superlative photography.

Louisiana Story is a documentary-type story told almost purely in camera terms. It has a slender, appealing story, moments of agonizing suspense, vivid atmosphere and superlative photography.

Filmed entirely in the bayou country of Louisiana, the picture tells of the Cajun (Acadian) boy and his parents, who live by hunting and fishing in the alligator-infested swamps and streams, and of the oil-drilling crew that brings its huge derrick to sink a well.

There probably aren’t more than 100 lines of dialog in the entire picture – long sequences being told by the camera, with eloquent sound effects and Virgil Thomson’s expressive music as background. There are no real heroes or villains (unless the terrifying alligators could be considered the latter). The simple Cajun family is friendly, and the oil-drilling crew is pleasant and likable.

Standard Oil of NJ contributed the necessary $200,000 production coin to Flaherty.

1948: Nomination: Best Motion Picture Story

Louisiana Story

Production

Lopert Films. Director Robert Flaherty; Producer Robert Flaherty; Screenplay Robert Flaherty, Frances Flaherty; Camera Richard Leacock; Editor Helen Van Dongen; Music Virgil Thomson

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1948. Running time: 77 MIN.

With

Joseph Boudreaux Lionel Le Blanc Mrs. E. Bienvenu Frank Hardy C.T. Guedry
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