The music is excellent, Tony Martin's singing is sock, and the Pepe Le Moko story has always been good, if familiar, screen fare. That the romantic melodrama doesn't always mesh too well with the musical story [by Erik Charell] makes for a distraction, but on the whole, this Marston production is generally on the credit side.

The music is excellent, Tony Martin’s singing is sock, and the Pepe Le Moko story has always been good, if familiar, screen fare. That the romantic melodrama doesn’t always mesh too well with the musical story [by Erik Charell] makes for a distraction, but on the whole, this Marston production is generally on the credit side.

Martin is good as the dashing thief whose elusive ways are the despair of the police. He makes full use of his s.a. vocalisthenics with the tuneful Leo Robin-Harold Arlen songs.

Story plot hews closely to the original yarn about the thief who hides in the Casbah from the police but is finally lured to his death by a beautiful girl. Suspense and intrigue are forced to a halt by musical portions, making John Berry’s direction seem ragged at times, but when film is telling the story the pace is expert.

Yvonne De Carlo is good as the native girl who loves Martin, but major femme interest goes to Swedish newcomer Marta Toren. Peter Lorre clicks strongly as the police inspector who finally gets his man. Hugo Haas sells his tourist guide character well and Douglas Dick scores as the informer.

Casbah

Production

Marston/Universal. Director John Berry; Producer Nat C. Goldstone; Screenplay Laslo Bush-Fekete, Arnold Manoff; Camera Irving Glassberg; Editor Edward Curtiss; Music Walter Scharf (arr.);; Art Director Bernard Herzbrun, John F. DeCuir

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1948. Running time: 93 MIN.

With

Yvonne De Carlo Tony Martin Peter Lorre Marta Toren Hugo Haas Thomas Gomez

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