Attired in the same strawhat and black-rimmed specs in his silent flickers, neither Harold Lloyd's person nor his comedy has changed much. As an added lure, director Preston Sturges has incorporated into the first 10 minutes of the film an actual sequence from Lloyd's The Freshman which the comedian made in 1923.

Attired in the same strawhat and black-rimmed specs in his silent flickers, neither Harold Lloyd’s person nor his comedy has changed much. As an added lure, director Preston Sturges has incorporated into the first 10 minutes of the film an actual sequence from Lloyd’s The Freshman which the comedian made in 1923.

Film segues expertly from the Freshman footage to the new product, showing Raymond Walburn, as an enthusiastic alumnus now head of a top ad agency, promising Lloyd a job for having won the game. Lloyd takes the job after graduation but is stuck immediately into a minor bookkeeper’s niche, where he remains forgotten for 22 years. Walburn finally remembers him long enough to fire him – which is where the fun starts.

Abetted by some excellent dialog from Sturges’ pen, Lloyd handles his role in his usual funny fashion. One sequence, in which he dangles from a leash 80 stories above the sidewalk, with the other end of the leash tied to a nervous lion, is standout.

The Sin of Harold Diddlebock

Production

California. Director Preston Sturges; Producer Preston Sturges; Screenplay Preston Sturges; Camera Robert Pittock; Editor Tom Neff; Music Werner Heymann; Art Director Robert Usher

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1947. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

Harold Lloyd Raymond Walburn Franklin Pangborn Margaret Hamilton Edgar Kennedy
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