This is a smart whodunit, with attention to scripting, casting and camerawork lifting it above the average. Pic has action and suspense, and certain quick touches of humor to add flavor. Ace performances by Dick Powell, as a gambling house overseer, and Lee J. Cobb, as a police inspector, also up the rating.

This is a smart whodunit, with attention to scripting, casting and camerawork lifting it above the average. Pic has action and suspense, and certain quick touches of humor to add flavor. Ace performances by Dick Powell, as a gambling house overseer, and Lee J. Cobb, as a police inspector, also up the rating.

Plot concerns Powell’s operation as a junior partner in Thomas Gomez’s gambling joint, and his allure for the ladies, especially Ellen Drew, the boss’s wife. A cop tries to cut into the gambling racket and is murdered. The hatcheck girl, sweet on the cop, is also killed. When the checker’s dancer sister (Evelyn Keyes) comes to find out what happened to the girl, she steps into a round of mystery centering about Powell.

Although the plot follows a familiar pattern, the characterizations are fresh and the performances good enough to overbalance. Dialog is terse and topical, avoiding the sentimental, phoney touch. Unusual camera angles come along now and then to heighten interest and momentarily arrest the eye. Strong teamplay by Robert Rossen, doubling as director-scripter, and Milton Holmes, original writer and associate producer, also aids in making this a smooth production.

Johnny O'Clock

Production

Columbia. Director Robert Rossen; Producer Edward G. Nealis; Screenplay Robert Rossen; Camera Burnett Guffey; Editor Warren Low, Al Clark; Music George Duning; Art Director Stephen Goosson, Cary Odell

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1947. Running time: 95 MIN.

With

Dick Powell Evelyn Keyes Lee J. Cobb Ellen Drew Nina Foch Jeff Chandler
Want Entertainment News First? Sign up for Variety Alerts and Newsletters!
Post A Comment 0