Review: ‘Cynthia’

Cynthia [from Vina Delmar's play, The Rich Full Life] has a simplicity that projects warmth and feeling, particularly for family audiences familiar with the teenage problems posed by its plot.

Cynthia [from Vina Delmar’s play, The Rich Full Life] has a simplicity that projects warmth and feeling, particularly for family audiences familiar with the teenage problems posed by its plot.

Elizabeth Taylor breathes plenty of life into the title role as a sheltered young girl who has never had a date or other fun generally accepted as matter-of-fact by teenagers. Plot builds to her first romance and first high school dance while depicting the myriad details of family life in a small town. Paternal frustration also is a factor in the yarn and is made believable by George Murphy and Mary Astor, the parents who were prevented from carrying out their dreams for the future by Taylor’s birth.

Murphy and Astor make an excellent team to carry the adult load. Taylor raises voice in song for school numbers to round out a talent display that registers strongly.

Cynthia

Production

M-G-M. Director Robert Z. Leonard; Producer Edwin H. Knopf; Screenplay Harold Buchman, Charles Kaufman; Camera Charles Schoenbaum; Editor Irvine Warburton; Music Bronislau Kaper, Johnny Green;; Art Director Cedric Gibbons, Edward Carfagno

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1947. Running time: 97 MIN.

With

Elizabeth Taylor George Murphy S.Z. Sakall Mary Astor Spring Byington Gene Lockhart
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