International Pictures takes its audience through a deep emotional bath in this moving filmization of Gwen Bristow's magazine serial and novel. Yarn is a variation of the Enoch Arden theme.

International Pictures takes its audience through a deep emotional bath in this moving filmization of Gwen Bristow’s magazine serial and novel. Yarn is a variation of the Enoch Arden theme.

It goes back to World War I, with Orson Welles and Claudette Colbert virtual newlyweds when the bugle’s note separates them. Badly disfigured and crippled, Welles allows himself to be mistakenly declared dead and makes a new life for himself in Austria under another name. Colbert, meantime, marries George Brent and is happily married until shortly before World War II, when Welles returns to the States to work as a chemist in Brent’s plant and he and Colbert again come face-to-face.

First half of the film goes from one heart-shaking sequence to another but, unfortunately Lenore Coffee in her screenplay has been unable to build to great climaxes.

Cast is solid throughout, director Irving Pichel even holding his children pretty well in check on precocity. Colbert gives an honest and sincere performance, while Welles, with beard, limp, cane and cough, has a tailored role for his brand of thespics. He certainly doesn’t underplay the part, but neither does he push it too heavily.

Tomorrow Is Forever

Production

RKO/International. Director Irving Pichel; Producer David Lewis; Screenplay Lenore Coffee; Camera Joseph Valentine; Editor Ernest Nims; Music Max Steiner; Art Director Wiard B. Ihnen

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1946. Running time: 102 MIN.

With

Claudette Colbert Orson Welles George Brent Lucille Watson Richard Long Natalie Wood
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