Monsieur Beaucaire is a frantic, screwballish version of Booth Tarkington's costume novel of high adventure in the days of silk-stockinged heroes. As such it has plenty of giggles and a few solidly-premised laughs.

Monsieur Beaucaire is a frantic, screwballish version of Booth Tarkington’s costume novel of high adventure in the days of silk-stockinged heroes. As such it has plenty of giggles and a few solidly-premised laughs.

With the script handed him, George Marshall’s direction measures up. He knows his way around a broadly aimed gag or situation, and proves it by milking each to its limit. Therein lies a fault of Beaucaire. Many sequences that could have played out on their own merits are unnecessarily embellished and eventually detract from the basically amusing yarn about a court barber forced to impersonate royalty.

Bob Hope plays the French barber, Beaucaire, with all stops out, waltzes through trying situations and varied romances with a bravado that is his particular forte. It’s all fun, but could have been even more so if treated with a bit less broadness.

Monsieur Beaucaire

Production

Paramount. Director George Marshall; Producer Paul Jones; Screenplay Melvin Frank, Norman Panama; Camera Lionel Lindon; Editor Arthur Schmidt; Music Robert Emmett Dolan; Art Director Hans Dreier, Earl Hedrick

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1946. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

Bob Hope Joan Caulfield Patric Knowles Cecil Kellaway
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