Review: ‘Waterloo Road’

Played against the drab, bomb-shattered background of a London slum, story is the familiar triangle theme with use of the flashback technique not adding to its originality. But it's acted with such sincerity and is so true-to-life in its characterization that the picture grips throughout. There is a terrific climax in which the two men (John Mills and Stewart Granger) fight for one woman as the bombs thunder down.

Played against the drab, bomb-shattered background of a London slum, story is the familiar triangle theme with use of the flashback technique not adding to its originality. But it’s acted with such sincerity and is so true-to-life in its characterization that the picture grips throughout. There is a terrific climax in which the two men (John Mills and Stewart Granger) fight for one woman as the bombs thunder down.

A soldier deserts when he learns his wife is receiving attentions from another man. Story depicts his day spent in pursuit of the pair, finally confronting them in a sports arcade.

Entire cast is adequate, but particular praise goes to Alastair Sim as the neighborhood doctor and George Carney’s role of pigeon fancier.

Picture [from a story by Val Valentine] is a striking example of how sound an English production can be if it keeps to the medium it interprets best, that of the middle-class character.

Waterloo Road

UK

Production

Gainsborough. Director Sidney Gilliat; Producer Edward Black; Screenplay Sidney Gilliat; Camera Arthur Crabtree; Editor Alfred Roome; Music Bob Busby; Art Director Alex Vetchinsky

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1945. Running time: 76 MIN.

With

John Mills Stewart Granger Alastair Sim Joy Shelton Beatrice Varley George Carney
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading