Review: ‘This Love of Ours’

Most commendable feature is the plot's originality. Charles Korvin plays a famous doctor whose young daughter (Sue England) has sanctified the memory of her presumably-dead mother. Visiting a Chicago nitery while attending a doctors' convention, Korvin meets Merle Oberon who, it turns out, is his 'dead' wife. She is working as accompanist for Claude Rains, an artist who does flash sketches of the bistro's patrons. She tries suicide after the meeting and Korvin saves her through an intricate operation.

Most commendable feature is the plot’s originality. Charles Korvin plays a famous doctor whose young daughter (Sue England) has sanctified the memory of her presumably-dead mother. Visiting a Chicago nitery while attending a doctors’ convention, Korvin meets Merle Oberon who, it turns out, is his ‘dead’ wife. She is working as accompanist for Claude Rains, an artist who does flash sketches of the bistro’s patrons. She tries suicide after the meeting and Korvin saves her through an intricate operation.

Film could have been a trite tear-jerker but Dieterle’s expert handling prevents that. Korvin seems to be just what the doctor ordered for the lonely-hearts club, and both he and Oberon do well with their roles. Supporting cast is outstanding, with Rains and the dimunitive England as the sensitive daughter, especially commendable.

This Love of Ours

Production

Universal. Director William Dieterle; Producer Howard Benedict; Screenplay Bruce Manning, John Klorer, Leonard Lee; Camera Lucien Ballard; Editor Frank Gross; Music Hans J. Salter; Art Director John B. Goodman, Robert Clatworthy

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1945. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

Merle Oberon Charles Korvin Claude Rains Carl Esmond Sue England Ralph Morgan
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