Walt Disney in The Three Caballeros reveals a new form of cinematic entertainment wherein he blends live action with animation into a socko feature production.

Walt Disney in The Three Caballeros reveals a new form of cinematic entertainment wherein he blends live action with animation into a socko feature production.

It’s a gay, colorful, resplendent conceit. Neatly conceived, it ties in many Pan-American highlights through the medium of irascible Donald Duck, the wiseguy Joe Carioca (first introduced in Saludos Amigos), and a lovable character in Panchito, the little South American boy.

It’s DD’s birthday and on Friday-the-13th he gets three huge packages of gifts from his friends in Latin America. What he unwraps as his ‘gifts’ are transplanted to this live action-animation feature. The off-screen narration is so skillfully blended with the dialog between Donald, Joe Carioca, et al, and it’s all so smoothly cut and edited, one is only casually conscious of where one stops and the other begins.

1945: Nominations: Best Scoring of a Musical Picture, Sound

The Three Caballeros

Production

RKO/Walt Disney. Director Norman Ferguson; Producer Walt Disney; Camera Ray Rennahan; Editor Don Holliday; Music Edward Plumb, Paul J. Smith, Charles Wolcott (dir.)

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1945. Running time: 71 MIN.

With

Aurora Miranda Carmen Molina Dora Luz
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