Fritz Lang, a master at getting the most out of mystery, intrigue and melodrama, in his direction apparently didn't have his way from beginning to end on Ministry of Fear. Pic [from the novel by Graham Greene] starts out to be a humdinger, and continues that way for the most part, but when the roundup of the spy gang gets underway the situation becomes drawn out and elementary, marring the footage that preceded.

Fritz Lang, a master at getting the most out of mystery, intrigue and melodrama, in his direction apparently didn’t have his way from beginning to end on Ministry of Fear. Pic [from the novel by Graham Greene] starts out to be a humdinger, and continues that way for the most part, but when the roundup of the spy gang gets underway the situation becomes drawn out and elementary, marring the footage that preceded.

Ray Milland, in the role of an ex-asylum inmate, who is released after serving two years for the ‘mercy’ killing of his incurable wife, gives a forthright performance. He is tossed into the midst of a spy chase when, in purchasing a ticket to London upon leaving the asylum, he is drawn to the crowds at a British fair and wins a cake by guessing its weight. The cake contains a capsule which one of the spies is to have delivered to other enemy agents..

Ministry of Fear

Production

Paramount. Director Fritz Lang; Producer B.G. De Sylva (exec.); Screenplay Seton I. Miller; Camera Henry Sharp; Editor Archie Marshek; Music Victor Young; Art Director Hans Dreier, Hal Pereira

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1945. Running time: 84 MIN.

With

Ray Milland Marjorie Reynolds Dan Duryea Carl Esmond Hillary Brooke Alan Napier
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