The screen calls it 'a story dedicated to the few who trained the many.' It's a convincing tribute to the last war aces (Yanks as well as British) and to grounded veterans of the Battle of Britain who took the rawest of raw material and made good airmen out of them.

The screen calls it ‘a story dedicated to the few who trained the many.’ It’s a convincing tribute to the last war aces (Yanks as well as British) and to grounded veterans of the Battle of Britain who took the rawest of raw material and made good airmen out of them.

The production was written, directed, photographed and produced by members of the RAF [all uncredited], some of them vets of the film biz, but all of them honest-to-God fliers. Also the cast, with four exceptions, was recruited from RAF personnel. Ronald Squire and Reginald Beck, in minor roles, and Edward G. Robinson and Bessie Love are the four pros who figure in the cast.

Film covers a wide range of territory, from the cloistered halls of Cambridge University to Falcon Field in Arizona, from the Canadian Navigation School to the blazing inferno of bomb-plastered Berlin. But it is the aerial camerawork in Journey Together that sets a new high. Most of final 15 minutes are shot inside a bomber with a degree of great skill.

Journey Together

UK

Production

RAF. Director [John Boulting]; Screenplay [Terence Rattigan]; Camera [Stanley Sayer, Harry Waxman]; Music Gordon Jacob

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1945. Running time: 95 MIN.

With

Edward G. Robinson Richard Attenborough Jack Watling David Tomlinson Ronald Squire Bessie Love
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