Grand Hotel in a 1945 Nazi setting, now known as Hotel Berlin, [both of them based on novels by Vicki Baum] is socko. The war's already lost - or, at least, there's that defeatist aura about Hotel Berlin - and the Nazi higherups are packing their loot for a South American getaway.

Grand Hotel in a 1945 Nazi setting, now known as Hotel Berlin, [both of them based on novels by Vicki Baum] is socko. The war’s already lost – or, at least, there’s that defeatist aura about Hotel Berlin – and the Nazi higherups are packing their loot for a South American getaway.

Producer Lou Edelman has guided his charges well. Productionally the lavishness is by suggestion rather than in reality. There are the periodic Allied air blitzes which chase everybody into the shelters, but otherwise it’s a Grand Hotel in the lobby or on the sundry floors, but particularly in the apartments of a general (Raymond Massey), an informer (Faye Emerson), or a theatre darling (Andrea King).

There are many suspenseful touches right along. The footage is replete with arresting meller. Whether it’s Dickie Tyler as the resourceful little bellboy of the underground, or the femme star who apparently first falls for Helmut Dantine (the escaped anti-Nazi) and later would turn him in, the situations are constantly intriguing.

Hotel Berlin

Production

Warner. Dir Peter Godfrey; Producer Louis F. Edelman; Screenplay Jo Pagano, Alvah Bessie; Camera Carl Guthrie; Editor Frank Magee; Music Franz Waxman Art Dir John Hughes

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1945. Running time: 98 MIN.

With

Helmut Dantine Andrea King Raymond Massey Faye Emerson Peter Lorre Alan Hale
Want Entertainment News First? Sign up for Variety Alerts and Newsletters!
Post A Comment 0