Narrative uses flashback technique to condense life of Col Robert Lee Scott Jr, army ace who gained fame with General Chennault's Flying Tigers.

Narrative uses flashback technique to condense life of Col Robert Lee Scott Jr, army ace who gained fame with General Chennault’s Flying Tigers.

Air fight sequences bear an authentic stamp, although studio-made and the thrills are good drama. Title derives from Scott’s realization that a pilot doesn’t face danger alone, and several of his real-life brushes with death sustain the belief.

There has been considerable condensation of Scott’s story, taken from his best-selling book of same title, and undoubtedly commercial license has pointed up some incidents for better dramatic flavor. It’s the story of a boy born to fly and spans his days from the time he first jumped off the barn with an umbrella, through model planes, West Point, flying the mail, instructing and his takeoff on a secret mission to China after Pearl Harbor.

Condensation was evidently more in the hands of the film editor than in the script. Finished picture indicates there was considerable scissoring to hold footage to reasonable length. Robert Florey’s direction manages authenticity and obtains excellent performances from the cast headed by Dennis Morgan.

God Is My Co-Pilot

Production

Warner. Director Robert Florey; Producer Robert Buckner; Screenplay Peter Milne, Abem Finkel; Camera Sid Hickox; Editor Folmer Blangsted; Music Franz Waxman; Art Director John Hughes

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1945. Running time: 83 MIN.

With

Dennis Morgan Dane Clark Raymond Massey Alan Hale Andrea King
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