Review: ‘Diamond Horseshoe’

You could call the Diamond Horseshoe the Creep Club and Billy Rose might be Joe Blow for all that matters. True, it lends an authenticity and realism which are undeniable. But more potent are the plot components. It builds a solid heart story in a manner which is enough of a switch on the backstage formula to make it different.

You could call the Diamond Horseshoe the Creep Club and Billy Rose might be Joe Blow for all that matters. True, it lends an authenticity and realism which are undeniable. But more potent are the plot components. It builds a solid heart story in a manner which is enough of a switch on the backstage formula to make it different.

Betty Grable and Dick Haymes are co-starred and this, of course, puts the crooner over solidly as a film juvenile. William Gaxton plays Haymes’ father, the lead at the Horseshoe, forever squabbling with Grable, the No. 1 cheesecake. Haymes gives up medicine for a stage career, and while Grable starts out under a cloud she emerges the noble influence to get him back to his MD studies, an objective in which Gaxton fails and for which he had blamed his son’s romantic vis-a-vis.

Per cinematic custom, some of the so-called cabaret revue numbers could happen only in Madison Square Gardens, but this again is accepted Hollywood license. On the other hand, the Diamond Horseshoe decor and policy are sometimes so faithful it’s startlingly familiar, even unto a lyrical ad for the joint, such as the line, ‘Two shows every night (without a cover)’.

Diamond Horseshoe

Production

20th Century-Fox. Director George Seaton; Producer William Perlberg; Screenplay George Seaton; Camera Ernest Palmer; Editor Robert Simpson; Music Alfred Newman (dir.); Art Director Lyle R. Wheeler, Joseph C. Wright

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1945. Running time: 104 MIN.

With

Betty Grable Dick Haymes Phil Silvers William Gaxton Margaret Dumont

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