Review: ‘When Strangers Marry’

Only thing wrong with this film is its misleading title. Tag, When Strangers Marry, suggests another of the problem plays of newlyweds when in reality pic is a taught psychological thriller about a murderer and a manhunt full of suspense and excitement.

Only thing wrong with this film is its misleading title. Tag, When Strangers Marry, suggests another of the problem plays of newlyweds when in reality pic is a taught psychological thriller about a murderer and a manhunt full of suspense and excitement.

Film has smart, fresh handling throughout, in scripting, direction and especially photography. Some neat angle shots, montages and other mood-instilling camera bits are worked in for proper effect without disrupting flow of narrative [from an original story by George Moscov]. Psych mood is cleverly sustained throughout for good atmosphere.

Two strangers are married after three meetings and immediately separated. The girl goes off to find her man. Then begins another type of manhunt, the police on the trail of a killer who to all intents and purposes is the disappearing husband. Girl finds her man in hiding, and the two continue dodging the cops.

Dean Jagger has the soft menacing air that befits the suspect. Kim Hunter, a comparative newcomer, is attractive as well as immensely appealing as the disraught but loyal wife. Robert Mitchum has a breezy quality to fit his role of boyfriend, and Neil Hamilton plays the police lieutenant quietly and with dignity.

When Strangers Marry

Production

Monogram. Director William Castle; Producer Maurice King, Franklin King; Screenplay Philip Yordan, Dennis J. Cooper; Camera Ira Morgan; Editor Martin G. Cohn; Music Dimitri Tiomkin; Art Director F. Paul Sylos

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1944. Running time: 67 MIN.

With

Dean Jagger Kim Hunter Robert Mitchum Neil Hamilton Lou Lubin Milt Kibbee
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading