Review: ‘Till We Meet Again’

For all its underground intrigue, Nazi brutality and Machiavellian Gestapo methods, film is a different sort of war romance. For one thing, its heroine is a novitiate nun and Ray Milland is an almost too happily married albeit dashing American aviator, forced down in occupied France.

For all its underground intrigue, Nazi brutality and Machiavellian Gestapo methods, film is a different sort of war romance. For one thing, its heroine is a novitiate nun and Ray Milland is an almost too happily married albeit dashing American aviator, forced down in occupied France.

Sometimes Milland’s love-hunger for his wife and child is a bit sticky, but it gets over a wholesome message of the American standard of love and marriage to the young French convent girl. To her it’s a new-found litany of love that awakens a new perspective on the mundane world as she accompanies Milland – as his pseudo-wife – in order to aid his escape with valuable secret papers from the French Underground for London.

Barbara Britton, a newcomer, is compelling as the beauteous but unworldly church disciple.

Till We Meet Again

Production

Paramount. Director Frank Borzage; Producer Frank Borzage; Screenplay Lenore Coffee; Camera Theodor Sparkuhl; Editor Elmo Veron; Music David Buttolph; Art Director Hans Dreier, Robert Usher

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1944. Running time: 85 MIN.

With

Ray Milland Barbara Britton Walter Slezak Mona Freeman Lucile Watson Vladimir Sokoloff
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