Based on the characterizations originally created by Dashiell Hammett, the story emerges as a neatly-fashioned whodunit. Richard Thorpe paces the plot nicely, overcoming, before too long, the hurdles of a rather slow opening.

Based on the characterizations originally created by Dashiell Hammett, the story emerges as a neatly-fashioned whodunit. Richard Thorpe paces the plot nicely, overcoming, before too long, the hurdles of a rather slow opening.

Production as a whole, however, lacks much of the sophistication and smartness which characterized the early Thin Man films. Deficiency is mainly in the dialog and other business provided for the two leads.

Yarn deals with an espionage ring working for a foreign power. Involves a battle of wits to secure a group of paintings which leads to a couple of killings.

Myrna Loy, while graceful and piquant for the most part, photographs unattractively in a number of sequences.

The Thin Man Goes Home

Production

M-G-M. Director Richard Thorpe; Producer Everett Riskin; Screenplay Robert Riskin, Dwight Taylor; Camera Karl Freund; Editor Ralph E. Winters; Music David Snell; Art Director Cedric Gibbons, Edward Carfagno

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1944. Running time: 100 MIN.

With

William Powell Myrna Loy Gloria de Haven Anne Revere Harry Davenport Edward Brophy
Want Entertainment News First? Sign up for Variety Alerts and Newsletters!
Post A Comment 0