Made as sequel to the profitable Cat People, this is highly disappointing because it fails to measure up as a horrific opus. Even though having the same principals as in the original chiller, this is an impossible lightweight. Chief trouble seems to be the over-supply of palaver and concern about a cute, but annoying child.

Made as sequel to the profitable Cat People, this is highly disappointing because it fails to measure up as a horrific opus. Even though having the same principals as in the original chiller, this is an impossible lightweight. Chief trouble seems to be the over-supply of palaver and concern about a cute, but annoying child.

Two directors worked on Curse of the Cat People, suggesting production headaches. Pair has turned out a strange cinema stew that is apt to make audiences laugh at the wrong scenes. Many episodes are unbelievably bad, with hardly anything happening in the first three reels.

Plot has the offspring of the first wife of a naval architect (Kent Smith) apparently suffering from the same supernatural beliefs that brought the death of the child’s mother. Yarn tries to show the child living in a dream world and imagining she is playing with her mother (Simone Simon). Youngster’s visit to a supposedly haunted house where a half-crazed character actress (Julia Dean) lives with her daughter (Elizabeth Russell) builds into the slight horrific angle of film, resulting in the best episodes in the production.

The Curse of the Cat People

Production

RKO. Director Gunther von Fritsch, Robert Wise; Producer Val Lewton; Screenplay DeWitt Bodeen; Camera Nicholas Musuraca; Editor J.R. Whittredge; Music Roy Webb;; Art Director Albert S. D'Agostino, Walter E. Keller

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1944. Running time: 70 MIN.

With

Simone Simon Kent Smith Jane Randolph Ann Carter Eve March Elizabeth Russell
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