Lost in a Harem is good standard fare for Abbott and Costello fans. The boys are in the groove, knocking themselves out for laughs in a slapstick bit of nonsense that is plenty corny at times, but is still funny.

Lost in a Harem is good standard fare for Abbott and Costello fans. The boys are in the groove, knocking themselves out for laughs in a slapstick bit of nonsense that is plenty corny at times, but is still funny.

The film has some neat production numbers built around appearances of Jimmy Dorsey and his orchestra. This also adds to the fun, gaudy Oriental costumes on the musicians adding to the incongruity of a modern jazz band in an exotic Baghdad kingdom. Photography in handling the Dorsey music-numbers is also fresh and original, for attractive intro of the music into the story.

Story has to do with a mystical eastern land where an American troupe has been stranded. Land is ruled by a sheik who has defrauded his nephew of the throne. Nephew (John Conte), knowing his uncle’s weakness for blondes, hires Marilyn Maxwell, troupe’s prima donna, and Abbott and Costello, troupe’s magic act, to regain his kingdom by stealing some magic rings his uncle wears.

Lost in a Harem

Production

M-G-M. Director Charles Riesner; Producer George Haight; Screenplay Harry Ruskin, John Grant, Harry Crane; Camera Lester White; Editor George Hively; Music Johnny Green (sup.); Art Director Cedric Gibbons, Daniel B. Cathcart

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1944. Running time: 88 MIN.

With

Bud Abbott Lou Costello Marilyn Maxwell John Conte
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